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Saturday, January 2, 2100

More About Me

Since the, "About Me" section of this blog is limited to a specific amount of characters, I decided to write a post that discusses more about what I have done in the pro-wrestling industry, beginning with when I first started in it and leading up to now.

Technically, I started back in the 1990's, contributing to, "Pro Wrestling Illustrated" and then, "Pro Wrestling Torch". In 1997, I contributed to The Official Website of the NWO. That same year, I briefly published my own newsletter, "The Wrestling Express".

In 1998, I taught myself how to design websites, and served as a consultant for various independent promotions. That next year, I worked as a website designer/maintainer for Dylan Summers (Necro Butcher) who was running the Texas-based Power Pro Wrestling Federation, and later was involved with Texas Outlaw Promotions.

During the period of 2000-2002, I was involved in many different projects at once. I was working as a website designer/publicist for talent, contributing to WCW.com, writing columns for independent promotions and the website of former WCW star The Stro, and writing for a variety of pro-wrestling media sites (including WrestlingObserver.com and PWTorch.com). In 2003, I began running my own website, World Wrestling Optimum, which consisted of news, articles, and interviews.

In 2004, I sent my resume to Linda McMahon, expressing interest in working for WWE. It was forwarded to Human Resources, and they contacted me that same day. I hadn't specified a particular position of interest in my resume, since I wasn't sure as to what ways WWE would feel that I could be utilized by them. I was asked if I was interested in an on-the-road or in office writing position. At that point in time, an in office position was what I was interested in, but an on-the-road position was what they wanted to fill. In the end, it was for the best. As a writer, I want to contribute to a promotion in a way that makes it better. However, I have learned in time that WWE has a specific vision that it wants their writers to carry out, and it's a vision that I disagree with more often than not.

Later that year, I started working for the Michigan-based Ultimate Championship Wrestling as a publicist/columnist. They were an affiliate of AWA Wrestling Superstars Live, and I soon became the publicist/columnist of the main governing body of AWA Wrestling Superstars Live as well. During my time working for UCW, I played a major role in bringing in new talent, due to over the years my having had come into contact with many talents being underused and going unnoticed in the industry.

In 2005, I started doing a column for 3PW. With DVDs sold nationwide, they had the potential to become much bigger than they already were at the time, and were very open to my ideas. I pushed for many changes behind-the-scenes. I had encouraged management to improve the production quality of their DVDs, which led to them dealing with a different production company. 3PW management had planned on waiting for it's fan base to increase before getting TV for 3PW. I explained how getting TV for 3PW is what would increase it's fan base, and I was then given the green light to find networks that were interested. Two networks were very interested, and I encouraged 3PW management to meet with them as soon as possible. Unfortunately, the owner of the company instead opted to shut 3PW down, due to losing interest. Working for 3PW put me in connection with the UK-based 1PW, who I worked as a columnist for.

After 3PW shut down, I began working as a publicist for independent promotions, including CHIKARA. I also worked as a columnist for CZW. Interestingly though, it was 2006 at this point yet I'm still most recognized for the work that I had done for 3PW and AWA/UCW.

In 2007 I started working as a columnist for XCW, a promotion that was seen nationally on MAVTV, had a national DVD deal, and also had PPV events. Working for a promotion of national status was my biggest achievement at that point, and two years later I reached a bigger achievement- Big Japan Pro-Wrestling. Along with working for them as a columnist and an Administrator for their Facebook page, I helped bring Big Japan Pro Wrestling together with Combat Zone Wrestling to form a working relationship after a previous working relationship between the two promotions had fallen apart. This new working relationship has led to Big Japan Pro Wrestling having their first event in the United States.

In October 2009 I assisted publicity & promotions company MGM Management with the HULKAMANIA- Let the Battle Begin tour by distributing their press release to pro-wrestling news sites that are popular with Australian fans, and conducting an interview with Solofa Fatu Jr. (better known as, "Rikishi"). Also, in 2012 I wrote a number of columns for Women Superstars Uncensored.

Monday, November 24, 2014

[NJPW] Help Get AXS TV On Time Warner

AXS TV is a channel that will feature NJPW in 2015. Unfortunately, Time Warner does not carry AXS TV. If you want to be able to see exciting NJPW action on AXS TV, fill out the form at http://www.axs.tv/subscribe/ and let them know that you want AXS TV.

Monday, July 21, 2014

[AJPW][PREVIEW] "Summer Action Series" 7/22/14

All-Japan Pro-Wrestling, "Summer Action Series" continues on July 22 at the Sayama Citizen Exchange Center in Sayama, Saitama, Japan. The card will be as follows:

Takashi Hijikata
Takao Omori
Jun Akiyama (1999 One Night Six Man Tag Team Tournament winner)
vs.
Yutaka Yoshie
Hikaru Sato (DDT Jiyugaoka Six-Person Tag Team champion and DDT Nihonkai Six-Man Tag Team champion) Suwama (former Tenryu Project Six Man Tag Team champion)

Shigehiro Irie (AJPW All Asia Tag Team champion)
Joe Doering (former World Tag Team champion)
vs.
Sushi
Zeus (former NWA Intercontinental Tag Team champion)

Kento Miyahara
vs.
Yoshinobu Kanemaru (former AJPW World Junior Heavyweight champion)

Keisuke Ishii (former DDT Extreme champion)
vs.
KENSO (two-time NJPW Young Lion Cup winner)

Atsushi Aoki (AJPW World Junior Heavyweight champion)
vs.
Soma Takao

Kotaro Suzuki (AJPW Gaora TV championship)
vs
Mitomi Masayuki


Sunday, July 20, 2014

NJPW G1 Climax 24

July 21 will be the first day of G1 Climax 24, NJPW's annual summer tournament which will run until August 10. It will be broadcast live from Hokkaido via Ustream iPPV at http://www.ustream.tv/njpw, 3pm start time (2am eastern time in the United States). Below are the blocks for this year:

Block A:
- Hiroshi Tanahashi
- Satoshi Kojima
- Yuji Nagata
- Tomoaki Honma
- Katsuyori Shibata
- Shinsuke Nakamura
- Tomohiro Ishii
- Shelton Benjamin
- Doc Gallows
- Davey Boy Smith Jr.
- Bad Luck Fale

Block B:
- Togi Makabe
- Hirooki Goto
- Tetsuya Naito
- Hiroyoshi Tenzan
- Kazuchika Okada
- Toru Yano
- Minoru Suzuki
- Lance Archer
- AJ Styles
- Yujiro Takahashi
- Karl Anderson

Below are all of the matches that have been scheduled for NJPW G1 Climax 24:

7/21/14 at the Hokkaido Prefectural Sports Center
Block A: Tomohiro Ishii vs. Bad Luck Fale
Block A: Shelton Benjamin vs. Doc Gallows
Block B: Hiroyoshi Tenzan vs. Karl Anderson
Block A: Satoshi Kojima vs. Yuji Nagata
Block B: Toru Yano vs. Minoru Suzuki
Block B: Tetsuya Naito vs. Yujiro Takahashi
Block B: Togi Makabe vs. Hirooki Goto
Block A: Hiroshi Tanahashi vs. Tomoaki Honma
Block A: Shinsuke Nakamura vs. Katsuyori Shibata
Block B: Kazuchika Okada vs. AJ Styles

7/23/14 at the Aomori Prefectural Budokan
Block A: Satoshi Kojima vs. Tomohiro Ishii
Block A: Shelton Benjamin vs. Bad Luck Fale
Block B: Hirooki Goto vs. Yujiro Takahashi
Block B: Tetsuya Naito vs. Lance Archer
Block A: Yuji Nagata vs. Tomoaki Honma
Block A: Shinsuke Nakamura vs. Davey Boy Smith Jr.
Block B: Toru Yano vs. AJ Styles
Block B: Hiroyoshi Tenzan vs. Kazuchika Okada
Block B: Togi Makabe vs. Karl Anderson
Block A: Hiroshi Tanahashi vs. Doc Gallows

7/25/14 at the Yamagata Sports Center
Block A: Tomoaki Honma vs. Doc Gallows
Block B: Lance Archer vs. Karl Anderson
Block B: Hiroyoshi Tenzan vs. Yujiro Takahashi
Block A: Tomohiro Ishii vs. Shelton Benjamin
Block B: Tetsuya Naito vs. Toru Yano
Block A: Katsuyori Shibata vs. Davey Boy Smith Jr.
Block A: Yuji Nagata vs. Bad Luck Fale
Block B: Hirooki Goto vs. Minoru Suzuki
Block A: Hiroshi Tanahashi vs. Satoshi Kojima
Block B: Togi Makabe vs. Kazuchika Okada

7/26/14 at the Akita Prefectural Gymnasium
Block A: Satoshi Kojima vs. Bad Luck Fale
Block A: Shelton Benjamin vs. Davey Boy Smith Jr.
Block B: Hiroyoshi Tenzan vs. Minoru Suzuki
Block B: Hirooki Goto vs. Toru Yano
Block A: Tomoaki Honma vs. Tomohiro Ishii
Block B: Togi Makabe vs. Lance Archer
Block A: Yuji Nagata vs. Shinsuke Nakamura
Block B: Tetsuya Naito vs. AJ Styles
Block B: Kazuchika Okada vs. Karl Anderson
Block A: Hiroshi Tanahashi vs. Katsuyori Shibata

7/28/14 at the Sendai Sun Plaza Hall
Block A: Tomohiro Ishii vs. Doc Gallows
Block B: Hiroyoshi Tenzan vs. Lance Archer
Block A: Satoshi Kojima vs. Davey Boy Smith Jr.
Block B: Minoru Suzuki vs. Yujiro Takahashi
Block B: Toru Yano vs. Karl Anderson
Block A: Katsuyori Shibata vs. Shelton Benjamin
Block B: Hirooki Goto vs. AJ Styles
Block A: Hiroshi Tanahashi vs. Bad Luck Fale
Block A: Tomoaki Honma vs. Shinsuke Nakamura
Block B: Tetsuya Naito vs. Kazuchika Okada

7/31/14 at Act City Hamamatsu
Block A: Doc Gallows vs. Bad Luck Fale
Block A: Yuji Nagata vs. Davey Boy Smith Jr.
Block B: Togi Makabe vs. Yujiro Takahashi
Block A: Satoshi Kojima vs. Katsuyori Shibata
Block B: Hirooki Goto vs. Karl Anderson
Block B: Minoru Suzuki vs. Lance Archer
Block A: Shinsuke Nakamura vs. Shelton Benjamin
Block B: Hiroyoshi Tenzan vs. AJ Styles
Block B: Kazuchika Okada vs. Toru Yano
Block A: Hiroshi Tanahashi vs. Tomohiro Ishii

8/1/14 at Korakuen Hall
Block A: Satoshi Kojima vs. Shelton Benjamin
Block B: Toru Yano vs. Lance Archer
Block B: Yujiro Takahashi vs. Karl Anderson
Block A: Davey Boy Smith Jr. vs. Doc Gallows
Block B: Hiroyoshi Tenzan vs. Hirooki Goto
Block A: Tomoaki Honma vs. Bad Luck Fale
Block B: Togi Makabe vs. Tetsuya Naito
Block A: Minoru Suzuki vs. AJ Styles
Block A: Yuji Nagata vs. Katsuyori Shibata
Block A: Shinsuke Nakamura vs. Tomohiro Ishii

8/3/14 at the Osaka Prefectural Gymnasium
Block A: Tomohiro Ishii vs. Davey Boy Smith Jr.
Block B: Hiroyoshi Tenzan vs. Toru Yano
Block A: Yuji Nagata vs. Shelton Benjamin
Block A: Satoshi Kojima vs. Doc Gallows
Block B: Hirooki Goto vs. Tetsuya Naito
Block B: Lance Archer vs. AJ Styles
Block B: Togi Makabe vs. Minoru Suzuki
Block A: Tomoaki Honma vs. Katsuyori Shibata
Block B: Kazuchika Okada vs. Yujiro Takahashi
Block A: Hiroshi Tanahashi vs. Shinsuke Nakamura

8/4/14 at the Aichi Prefectural Gymnasium
Block A: Tomoaki Honma vs. Davey Boy Smith Jr.
Block B: Lance Archer vs. Yujiro Takahashi
Block A: Yuji Nagata vs. Doc Gallows
Block B: Togi Makabe vs. Hiroyoshi Tenzan
Block B: Tetsuya Naito vs. Minoru Suzuki
Block A: Katsuyori Shibata vs. Bad Luck Fale
Block A: Satoshi Kojima vs. Shinsuke Nakamura
Block B: AJ Styles vs. Karl Anderson
Block A: Hiroshi Tanahashi vs. Shelton Benjamin
Block B: Hirooki Goto vs. Kazuchika Okada NJPW

8/6/14 at the Takamatsu City Gymnasium
Block A: Satoshi Kojima vs. Tomoaki Honma
Block A: Davey Boy Smith Jr. vs. Bad Luck Fale
Block B: Hiroyoshi Tenzan vs. Tetsuya Naito
Block B: Karl Anderson vs. Minoru Suzuki
Block B: Togi Makabe vs. Toru Yano
Block B: AJ Styles vs. Yujiro Takahashi
Block B: Kazuchika Okada vs. Lance Archer
Block A: Hiroshi Tanahashi vs. Yuji Nagata
Block A: Tomohiro Ishii vs. Katsuyori Shibata
Block A: Shinsuke Nakamura vs. Doc Gallows

8/8/14 at the Yokohama Bunka Gymnasium
Block A: Tomoaki Honma vs. Shelton Benjamin
Block A: Yuji Nagata vs. Tomohiro Ishii
Block A: Katsuyori Shibata vs. Doc Gallows
Block A: Hiroshi Tanahashi vs. Davey Boy Smith Jr.
Block A: Shinsuke Nakamura vs. Bad Luck Fale
Block B: Toru Yano vs. Yujiro Takahashi
Block B: Hirooki Goto vs. Lance Archer
Block B: Tetsuya Naito vs. Karl Anderson
Block B: Kazuchika Okada vs. Minoru Suzuki
Block B: Togi Makabe vs. AJ Styles

8/10/14 at the Seibu Dome
Block A 2nd place vs. Block B 2nd place
FINAL: Block A 1st place vs. Block B 1st place

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

WWE's Financial Problems, and a Simple Solution

It's not a secret that WWE has been having financial problems as of late, as it has not only been mentioned in pro-wrestling dirtsheets and on pro-wrestling dirtsites, but it has been mentioned by the mainstream media as well. The company's biggest problems began when the WWE Network did not turn out to be (so far at least) the profitable success that WWE expected. The company expected to gain at least 1.4 million subscribers so that they will make a profit (and 2 million by the end of the year), and since that has yet to happen, WWE could lose $50 million dollars this year. The fact that WWE's newest TV rights contract was not as impressive as they expected it to be hasn't helped matters, as the company's stock crashed as a result.

WWE has been implementing a number of initiatives recently. This week, the company offered a one-week free trial of the WWE Network to fans. In June, a number of talents were released, reportedly to cut costs as a result of money lost due to the network. It has also been reported that the company has cut budgets and is delaying production on programs that were planned to be shown on the network.

There are many critics that claim the WWE Network was a mistake and should be shut down. I personally feel that the concept of the WWE Network is a great one, particularly because it potentially draws people who no longer watch pro-wrestling but were fans of WCW and the 80's-90's period of WWE. However, I do think that it was a mistake for WWE to rely on it to the point that they're putting as much focus on it as they currently are. It was WWE itself that had set the standard decades ago that a wrestling promotion should have national/worldwide TV, a DVD deal, and PPV as streams of revenue. Today, the WWE Network has cost WWE TV revenue (Ion dropped, "WWE Main Event" when WWE Network began broadcasting episodes of the program one day before Ion did), and PPV revenue (major satellite and cable providers dropped WWE PPVs due to WWE Network presenting them to fans at a lower cost). One thing that the company hopefully realized is that if they ever do shut down the WWE Network, WWE may lose the audience that is currently watching their live major events via the network- it would be very difficult to convince a fan to pay $44.95/$59.95 to see a live WWE event that they were previously seeing for $9.99. My strategy would have been to use the WWE Network solely to provide video on demand and original programming.

However, what's done is done, and since it's realistically too late to change the format of the WWE Network, the product itself must be looked at if the company wants to make changes that will be profitable. Changes in production quality isn't the answer, since fans are accustomed to its top notch look. Nor is releasing talent the solution. The simple solution is to listen to their paying fans and give them what they want, something that WWE hasn't seemed to be have been truly doing for quite some time. Currently, it appears that WWE attempts to anticipate what fans will want to see in the future.

In the 1980's and 1990's, the titles, main storylines, and main event matches always involved the talents who were the top draws at the time. This is because WWE paid much attention to its audience, particularly a very valuable segment of it, commonly referred to as "marks". They are the segment of WWE's audience that helps keep it (as well as the business in general) alive- they are the loudest segment of the audience when it comes to talking with their money. And when it comes to running a pro-wrestling company, that's the audience that should matter the most.

It's clear that WWE is currently engaging in a youth initiative. Bray Wyatt and Paige are the best examples of this. The Bray Wyatt persona made its WWE debut in July 2013, and already Wyatt has had feuds with Kane (who has main event-level popularity even though he's usually used as a midcarder), defeated Kane at WWE SummerSlam, feuded with main eventer John Cena, defeated Cena at WWE Extreme Rules, and wrestled in the main event WWE Heavyweight Championship, "Ladder" match at WWE Money in the Bank. Paige won the WWE Divas Championship on the same night that she made her debut on the main roster.

It's understandable that WWE is pushing their new, young talents, because main eventers who are in their late-30's and older will likely be retiring sooner than later, and WWE wants to create new stars. But the problem is, WWE can't create new stars. Nor could they ever. In fact, there has never been a promotion that created a new star. The only entity that has ever created a new star is the fans. No matter how many titles are put on a talent or how many main eventers that talent is put over, that talent will not draw unless the fans already consider them a star.

Midcarders should be used as midcarders, instead of being forced into the main event scene. Otherwise, it's like attempting to force a piece in a puzzle that doesn't fit- eventually management may become displeased when the talent isn't making the progress that was expected of them, and then become frustrated to the point that they give up on the talent altogether.

And there is no shame in being a mdicarder, because just as every television series needs a good supporting cast, every wrestling promotion needs a good midcard. When the fans are ready to see a midcarder moved up to the main event, they will tell WWE with increased ratings, increased ticket sales, increased buyrates, and increased merchandise sales. Crowd reactions at shows are not a good indicator, and John Cena is perfect proof of this. When Cena appears in an arena, he is greeted with a chorus of boos and chants of, "Cena Sucks". Meanwhile, Cena is the company's top full-time drawing wrestler, and his merchandise sells better than any other full-time wrestler. The reason for this is that the Cena haters are "smarks"- a very vocal (and usually negative) minority segment of the pro-wrestling audience. While they are expressing their passion for pro-wrestling vocally, the marks are expressing their passion financially at merchandise stands, purchasing Cena memorabilia.

WWE needs to give fans what they want right now, as opposed to giving them what they think they will want in the future. Because fans are not interested in paying for future gratification, they're paying to be entertained right now. Give fans main event matches and storylines involving true main eventers- the ones who the fans will pay to see. When its time for a midcarder to move to the next level, WWE will know, because they won't have to give that talent a push- the fans will do it.

Monday, June 30, 2014

Bullet Club: Taking NJPW to Another Level

This past Sunday, NJPW presented “KIZUNA ROAD 2014" to a sold-out crowd in Tokyo's legendary Korakuen Hall. The main event was Tomohiro Ishii vs. Yujiro Takahashi for the NEVER Openweight Championship, which resulted in Takahashi winning and becoming the new Champion. Not only is this an accomplishment for Takahashi, but it is also an accomplishment for the Bullet Club faction, as they now have control over all of NJPW's heavyweight titles: AJ Styles holds the IWGP Heavyweight Championship, Doc Gallows & Karl Anderson are the IWGP Tag Team Champions, and Bad Luck Fale holds the IWGP Intercontinental Championship.

While NJPW prides itself on sportsmanship, Bullet Club goes against everything that the company stands for, with the faction members interfering in each other's matches, keeping themselves at the top of NJPW. Many long-time NJPW fans say that Bullet Club has sabotaged the company, as they conduct themselves in a manner that NJPW fans are unaccustomed to. While that may be debatable, one thing is certain- Bullet Club is one of the best things that has ever happened to NJPW.

Bullet Club has a great amount of potential, with most of its members being talents who are very familiar to fans even if they are not necessarily very familiar with NJPW. The Bullet Club brand has even expanded into Mexico, where a sub-group (Bullet Club Latinoamerica) proudly represents the faction. With Bullet Club's current high standing in the pro-wrestling industry as a brand, their influence is helping NJPW gain more popularity not only in Japan, but outside of Japan as well. Fans are ordering NJPW iPPVs to see the best known Bullet Club members, which then leads to them being exposed to the Bullet Club members who they are not familiar with, along with the other members of the NJPW roster.

Bullet Club is frequently compared to the legendary NWO, especially since the Bullet Club members do poses and gestures that NWO members used to do. Bullet Club and the NWO are perfect examples of how even though wrestling and puroresu have different styles, they inspire each other- just as the Bullet Club was inspired by WCW's NWO, the NWO was inspired by a UWF invasion of NJPW that took place before the NWO made its debut. And along with the comparisons between Bullet Club and the NWO is the question of whether or not Bullet Club will ultimately have a positive impact financially on NJPW as the NWO did on WCW. The fact is, they already have begun to- Bullet Club Bone Soldier T-shirts are currently among the company's top-selling merchandise items.

With Bullet Club having a lot of momentum right now, the faction members should be utilized to their fullest potentials. Bullet Club already has all of the major titles in NJPW- they should go after the other titles in the company as well. The faction now setting their sights on the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship and IWGP Junior Heavyweight Tag Team Championship would increase the value of these titles in the eyes of fans, which would benefit NJPW. Although Tama Tonga mainly has tag team matches in NJPW, he is talented enough to shine as a singles talent, and would be a good choice as the person to pursue the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship for the faction. The Young Bucks held the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Tag Team Championship until they were recently defeated by Time Splitters, so it would make sense for them to once again represent Bullet Club in an attempt to bring the title back to the faction.

Lastly, I think Bullet Club should have its own website, as the NWO did. The NWO website was a place where the faction launched propaganda, drawing attention from both fans who liked and disliked them. The bottom line was that it drew visitors, which benefited WCW as a company. The same can be done for NJPW via a Bullet Club website. It could feature a Bullet Club mission statement, bios of each member, a merchandise page, a news page updating visitors on what the faction is up to, and pro-Bullet Club articles.

Bullet Club does not represent any of the traditional aspects of puroresu, and tradition is highly regarded in Japan. But instead of Bullet Club (and to an extent NJPW) being an alternative to traditional puroresu, what they really are is an aspect of puroresu/NJPW that makes it more interesting than it already was. NJPW has been one of the most successful pro-wrestling companies in Japan for 42 years, and Bullet Club has helped NJPW increase in popularity in the United States. If the faction is utilized to its fullest extent, Bullet Club will benefit NJPW in the long-term as the company's fan base grows and continues to expand into other countries.

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Where Does GFW Potentially Stand in the Pro-Wrestling Industry?

Pro-wrestling companies based in the United States having working relationships with pro-wrestling companies based in other countries is nothing new. ROH works with NJPW, a Japan-based company that has existed for 42 years and is continuing to grow. TNA works with Wrestle-1, the newest major company in Japan. However, Jeff Jarrett's Global Force Wrestling has the potential to become the most international professional-wrestling company in the industry since WCW.

In the 1990's, WCW simultaneously had a working relationship with not only NJPW, but also AAA, one of the biggest pro-wrestling companies in Mexico (which will begin airing a weekly program on the El Rey network this fall, and will also be having PPV events). WCW and NJPW co-produced many PPV events, WCW took part in an NJPW-produced supercard in 1996, and the two companies traded talent on a regular basis. Meanwhile, WCW co-promoted a lucha libre PPV with AAA in 1994, and booked AAA talent for WCW events frequently in the mid-1990's. Out of all of the companies that defined themselves as being of worldwide status, WCW best represented that definition.

Now, Global Force Wrestling has positioned themselves where they can potentially be established in the same manner that WCW was as being a true GLOBAL company. GFW talent can appear on AAA-TV and PPVs, as well as NJPW iPPVs. Meanwhile, GFW could present American fans with talent from Mexico and Japan, names that they are familiar with as well as talent that they currently are unaware of but should know about. Not only would this legitimize GFW as a global company, but it would give AAA and NJPW increased exposure as well.

And the GFW's relationships with AAA and NJPW can go even further than that. With GFW still in its building stages, the company currently does not have a champion. This could set the stage for GFW to have a championship tournament of truly global proportions. If GFW were to have a championship tournament featuring talent from GFW, AAA, and NJPW, American fans would have the opportunity to see matches between top Mexican and Japanese talent. And a GFW Title tournament done in this fashion would provide the unpredictability that pro-wrestling fans enjoy, and opportunity that all pro-wrestlers desire.

The tournament could take place in either the United States, Mexico, or Japan. It could feature recognized talent from AAA (El Mesías, Cibernético), NJPW (Kazuchika Okada, Hiroshi Tanahashi, Manabu Nakanishi), as well as recognized American talent currently working for NJPW or AAA (AJ Styles, Jack Evans). Who would the first GFW champion be? Someone from the GFW roster? An AAA or NJPW star? It would be anyone's guess, in a tournament filled with drama and suspense. And most importantly, the GFW title could be considered a true world title.

GFW has the potential to bring a style of surprise and excitement that would be unique to the current pro-wrestling landscape, and one that would benefit the industry on an international level. And pro-wrestling fans are always open to something different for them to enjoy. If Jeff Jarrett and GFW gives the fans action that they want to see and deserve, gives opportunities to currently underutilized talent, along with has a proficient team of creatives behind all of it, GFW can become one of the top organizations in the industry.