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Sunday, January 3, 2100

More About Me

Since the, "About Me" section of this blog is limited to a specific amount of characters, I decided to write a post that discusses more about what I have done in the pro-wrestling industry, beginning with when I first started in it and leading up to now.

Technically, I started back in the 1990's, contributing to, "Pro Wrestling Illustrated" and then, "Pro Wrestling Torch". In 1997, I contributed to The Official Website of the NWO. That same year, I briefly published my own newsletter, "The Wrestling Express".

In 1998, I taught myself how to design websites, and served as a consultant for various independent promotions. That next year, I worked as a website designer/maintainer for Dylan Summers (Necro Butcher) who was running the Texas-based Power Pro Wrestling Federation, and later was involved with Texas Outlaw Promotions.

During the period of 2000-2002, I was involved in many different projects at once. I was working as a website designer/publicist for talent, contributing to WCW.com, writing columns for independent promotions and the website of former WCW star The Stro, and writing for a variety of pro-wrestling media sites (including WrestlingObserver.com and PWTorch.com). In 2003, I began running my own website, World Wrestling Optimum, which consisted of news, articles, and interviews.

In 2004, I started working for the Michigan-based Ultimate Championship Wrestling as a publicist/columnist. They were an affiliate of AWA Wrestling Superstars Live, and I soon became the publicist/columnist of the main governing body of AWA Wrestling Superstars Live as well. During my time working for UCW, I played a major role in bringing in new talent, due to over the years my having had come into contact with many talents being underused and going unnoticed in the industry.

In 2005, I started doing a column for 3PW. With DVDs sold nationwide, they had the potential to become much bigger than they already were at the time, and were very open to my ideas. I pushed for many changes behind-the-scenes. I had encouraged management to improve the production quality of their DVDs, which led to them dealing with a different production company. 3PW management had planned on waiting for it's fan base to increase before getting TV for 3PW. I explained how getting TV for 3PW is what would increase it's fan base, and I was then given the green light to find networks that were interested. Two networks were very interested, and I encouraged 3PW management to meet with them as soon as possible. Unfortunately, the owner of the company instead opted to shut 3PW down, due to losing interest. Working for 3PW put me in connection with the UK-based 1PW, who I worked as a columnist for.

After 3PW shut down, I began working as a publicist for independent promotions, including CHIKARA. I also worked as a columnist for CZW. Interestingly though, it was 2006 at this point yet I'm still most recognized for the work that I had done for 3PW and AWA/UCW.

In 2007 I started working as a columnist for XCW, a promotion that was seen nationally on MAVTV, had a national DVD deal, and also had PPV events. Working for a promotion of national status was my biggest achievement at that point, and two years later I reached a bigger achievement- Big Japan Pro-Wrestling. Along with working for them as a columnist and an Administrator for their Facebook page, I helped bring Big Japan Pro Wrestling together with Combat Zone Wrestling to form a working relationship after a previous working relationship between the two promotions had fallen apart. This new working relationship has led to Big Japan Pro Wrestling having their first event in the United States.

In October 2009 I assisted publicity & promotions company MGM Management with the HULKAMANIA- Let the Battle Begin tour by distributing their press release to pro-wrestling news sites that are popular with Australian fans, and conducting an interview with Solofa Fatu Jr. (better known as, "Rikishi"). Also, in 2012 I wrote a number of columns for Women Superstars Uncensored.

Recently, I have done social media for Great North Wrestling.

I am currently writing for Michinoku Pro Wrestling. Since the time that I began writing for them, Michinoku Pro had a sellout, standing room only event on December 13, 2019 at the Korakuen Hall. The Korakuen Hall is known as a place where many historical moments in the Japanese pro-wrestling scene have occurred. It's to Japan what Madison Square Garden is to the pro-wrestling scene in the United States. The event had an attendance of 1,890. That was the highest reported attendance at the Korakuen Hall to date for a pro-wrestling event since April 2015.

I am available for more writing work. I create, edit, and rewrite promotional content on websites and social media platforms for companies, as well as design, develop, and direct their web presence and brand identity. I can be contacted via info@harold-williams.com

Samples of my work: http://dld.bz/jeRzq

Sunday, January 31, 2021

The Internet's Impact on Sports/Fitness Industry Influencers

Although I have been a writer in the pro-wrestling industry since the 1990's, it still amazes me how much of an impact the Internet has had on influencers and bloggers in the sports industry. I lived in New York most of my life, but thanks to the Internet I have been able to connect with and subsequently write for pro-wrestling companies across the United States and around the world. I went from contributing to The Official Website of the NWO and WCW.com in the 1990's and early-2000s to writing columns for many independent promotions that were based in various states. In 2004, I started working for the Michigan-based Ultimate Championship Wrestling as a publicist/columnist, and they were the biggest independent promotion in the state at that time. That next year, I started doing a column for 3PW, a Philadelphia-based promotion that had DVDs available for sale in stores nationwide. Working for 3PW put me in connection with the UK-based 1PW, who I worked as a columnist for. In 2007 I started working as a columnist for XCW, a Texas-based promotion that was seen nationally on MAVTV, had a national DVD deal, and also had PPV events.

Two years later I began working for Big Japan Pro-Wrestling as a columnist, six years before I moved to Japan. I am currently writing for Michinoku Pro Wrestling. Since the time that I began writing for them, Michinoku Pro had a sellout, standing room only event on December 13, 2019 at the Korakuen Hall. The Korakuen Hall is known as a place where many historical moments in the Japanese pro-wrestling scene have occurred. It's to Japan what Madison Square Garden is to the pro-wrestling scene in the United States. The event had an attendance of 1,890. That was the highest reported attendance at the Korakuen Hall to date for a pro-wrestling event since April 2015.

Many of these opportunities in the pro-wrestling industry became available to me as a result of the growth of social media, and the growth is going to continue. According to market and consumer data provider Statista.com, "In 2020, over 3.6 billion people were using social media worldwide, a number projected to increase to almost 4.41 billion in 2025."

Looking at social media growth at specifically the sports industry in general, market research company GlobalWebIndex states that going on social media as a result of watching or following sports events had increased by 47% in 2016, and 22% of consumers now look for sports content on social media.

Influencers & bloggers in the fitness industry have experienced recent growth as well due to the coronavirus pandemic. News reporter Melissa Howell of Washington’s Top News (WTOP) recently covered this topic, looking at the fitness trends to watch this year. She notes that the top trend for 2021 is online training.

One of the influencers that this is positive news for is Heather Matthews, owner of HLM Fitness, an online company that focuses on helping women build their confidence enough to make good health decisions. Matthews is a very qualified fitness influencer- she is a National Academy of Sports Medicine Certified Personal Trainer, a NASM fitness nutrition Specialist, and a National Exercise and Sports Trainers Association Lifestyle and Weight Mgmt Specialist. In an interview, she discussed her background and role in the industry.

With sports/fitness influencers & bloggers continuing to grow in 2021, it will be interesting to see how the landscape looks a year from now.

Monday, December 14, 2020

[Michinoku Pro][RESULTS] 2020 Tokyo Tournament-Struggle for Power- 12/11/20

After a one-year absence, Michinoku Pro finally returned to the Korakuen Hall in Tokyo on December 13 for pro-wrestling action, highlighted by the appearance of an AEW star and costumed chaos in the 15th edition of "Space War", Michinoku Pro's annual year-end special match. Many prevention measures were taken at the event to prevent coronavirus infection so that fans would have peace of mind and could focus on the night's great action.



In the first match, the team of Yasuyoshi Ogasawara & Takuro Niki faced the team of Tatsuya Hanami & Daiju Wakamatsu. This match was no doubt a big moment for Ogasawara, as his career began in November and on this night he was making his Korakuen Hall debut during Michinoku Pro's biggest show of the show. Niki's career began in 2019 and he may be familiar to fans from his appearances in AJPW and BJW. Tatsuya Hanami is a member of the 2AW roster, where he has held the promotions Tag Team Championship. Daiju Wakamatsu is also a member of the 2AW roster, and has appeared in AJPW, ZERO1, and BJW. All four wrestlers are young, talented, aggressive, and show much promise.





In the end, Tatsuya Hanami & Daiju Wakamatsu were victorious, with Hanami gaining the win for his team with a modified cobra clutch submission.



Next it was time for the, "Gatoh Move" match. Gatoh Move is a Thailand-based promotion founded by AEW star, legend, and Asia Dream Tag Team Champion Emi Sakura. In this match, she teamed with Suruga Mei to go against Baliyan Akki and Chie Koishikawa.



With all four of them being members of the Gatoh Move talent roster, this match was their opportunity to show all of the fans in attendance the fast action, comedy, surprises, and high-flying maneuvers that are trademarks of Gatoh Move matches.



And of course, Emi Sakura did the, "We Will Rock You” corner splash that she has also done in front of 1,140,000 American viewers during AEW's TV show, "Dynamite".



When this action packed, "Gatoh Move" match was over, Emi Sakura and Suruga Mei stood victorious, with Sakura picking up the win for her team.



In the next match, Ken45 & Violento Jack went against Jinsei Shinzaki & Rasse. All four men are quite familiar with tag team action:

Ken45 (who was making his return to the Korakuen Hall on this night after a two-year absence) is a former Tohoku & UWA World Tag Team Champion.



Violento Jack is a current and three-time King Of FREEDOM Tag Team Champion. His current reign is the longest reign in FREEDOMS history.



Jinsei Shinzaki is a former Tohoku Tag Team Champion.



Rasse is also a former Tohoku Tag Team Champion.



The tag team action was fast and intense.



In the end, Violento Jack gained the win for his team with a pinfall victory over Rasse after delivering his, "Violento Breaker" signature move.



In the semi-main event, it was time for four members of Michinoku Pro's bright future to shine, as Rui Hyugaji & MUSASHI faced Yasutaka Oosera & Koji Kawamura



This was an action-packed match as all four wrestlers who began their careers in Michinoku Pro showed why the promotion is one to take notice of whenever they travel outside of the Tōhoku region to an area near you.



In the end, Rui Hyugaji showed why he is not only the current Tohoku Junior Heavyweight Champion but also a former Tohoku & UWA World Tag Team Champion when he picked up the win for his team after delivering a diving elbow drop.



In the main event, it was the annual year-end special Michinoku Pro match, "Space War". Michinoku Pro fans have come to expect Space Wars to be filled with costumes, chaos, weapons, the ring being taken apart, and The Great Sasuke putting his life on the line while being inside of a barrel. And the fans were not disappointed.



"Abdullah Marshmallow" was Abdullah Kobayashi, five-time former BJW Death Match Heavyweight Champion. His third reign was the fifth-longest reign in BJW history.



Participants continued to enter the ring.



The match was wild, and the fans loved every minute of it.



The ring was taken apart.



Then things became crazier.



The Great Sasuke took a dangerous barrel dive.



The Great Sasuke was then powerbombed onto the ring's now-exposed steel beams.



The Great Sasuke later dived from the top turnbuckle to a table below, which he slipped off of and then fell to the floor



Since it's impossible to keep a legend down, The Great Sasuke rose again, this time to deliver a Senton Atomico with a ladder around his neck to pick up the win for his team.